Food for thought at Sjaki-Tari-Us, Ubud, Bali

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On one of our many wanders around Ubud we stumbled upon Sjaki-Tari-Us. Well, I say stumble, it's pretty well hidden and quite hard to 'stumble' upon, thanks to it's position at the end of a thin path edging a big field. We only found it because we were hunting down a Geocache (a worldwide GPS treasure hunt).

A spread for dinner at Sjaki-Tari-Us in Ubud, Bali.

The cache was in a box between two classrooms inside Sjaki-Tari-Us which it turns out is a school for children who are disabled or have learning difficulties. I'm not sure who thought to put a Geocache there but they should earn an honorary marketing degree from somewhere special because it was a genius move.


Hidden as it is down that thin path and away from the road, the staff told us that a lot of their visitors discover the school by way of the Geocache. It brings in tourists who, like us, browse the shop or stay for lunch in the warung (family style restaurant).

Sjaki's warung is an open-plan space alongside the main school hall with views over the field and offers a small menu of Indonesian food. Some of the school's teenaged students work there, learning to cook and to serve customers whilst earning a small salary along the way.



We ate nasi goreng and roasted chicken with rice and gado gado. The food was good. Dave's chicken in particular was really tasty and probably the highlight of the meal. Mine bore a striking resemblance to the supernoodles I remember from university but the stirfried veggies and sate alongside the noodles were nice.

Whilst we were in Bali we definitely ate worse food in restaurants charging double although let's be honest, visiting Sjaki-Tari-Us isn't about haute cuisine. It's about getting involved, donating some money and helping make a difference.


Although neither of us are particularly good with kids (or even like them much) we were quite moved by this unexpected place and after paying for our meal we stood and emptied our pockets into the donation box, much to the waitresses amusement. It'd been raining and the paper banknotes were all soggy so I had to roll them up and push them into the box one by one.


The school, I've since learnt, was founded by an Indonesian-Dutch couple who have a daughter with downs syndrome. Back in the 1990's on a visit to Bali they recognised that education for disabled children is not as well developed in Indonesia as it is in Europe and so, they decided to set up the charity. They rely completely on donations and gifts to keep the school running and many of the staff are volunteers.

You can donate via paypal or even better, visit Sjaki-Tari-Us for yourself, buy something from the shop, enjoy lunch and interact with the kids. 

Find them at: JL Monkey Forest, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia and visit their website here.
We have a Geocaching profile by the way, follow us here.

14 comments

  1. What a beautiful experience! It reminds me of the Ziferblat cafes popping up around the UK, where you pay per minute you're there and they're generally run by homeless people.
    Cx
    charliedistracted.com 

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    1. Oh that's cool, I've not heard of those (even though I'm from the UK!) so will definitely look them up when I get home :-)

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  2. It's been a while since I was in Ubud. When I return, I definitely want to check out Sjaki-Tari-Us. The food and drinks look great in your photos, plus I love the mission they are supporting.

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    1. Yes please do! It's well worth stopping by for lunch!

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  3. I love this so much! It's so important as tourists to spend our money at places that give back to the community.

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    1. Yes I totally agree with what you've said. I'm on the look out for more places like this now on my travels!

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  4. This looks wonderful! I love stumbling across cool things. Thanks for sharing. PS: that drink is perfect!!!

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  5. This is really heartwarming. Nice to hear about a place that is really trying to make a difference in the world. Bonus that it seems like a nice restaurant.

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  6. My Dad loves geocaching, maybe it is time I started, too. I am so pleased that you found an amazing spot for lunch from your treasure hunt, what a nice bonus!

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  7. Food looks so delicious, thanks for sharing this address

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  8. I love food blogs, and this looks like a cool place to have lunch at! So nice that they let students work there!

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  9. Very nice mission they're supporting, love that you can travel and give back to the community :)

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  10. What a wonderful story. I love that geocaching is bringing people to a place they normally wouldn't find. I think it's lovely you have included a dontaion page for the school aswell. Great cause!

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  11. I loved Ubud - there's still so much I haven't seen though and this looks like another good reason to go again! Thanks for sharing this hidden gem, that Mojito made me thirsty!

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